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(38) Research on Food: make-your-own-little-Research.

Every Monday, during a month on Researchista’s Blog you will find a new subject in which we invite one or more Researchers to talk about it. They are called “Special Guests” (because they are special and because they are guests). At the end of every subject (4th week of each month), Researchista is inviting anyone willing to explore how that topic affects their daily life. This section is called “Make-your-own-little-Research” and is encouraging everyone to make their Research (it’s called little, because is our own private investigation 😉 ), by giving an example of how to use different Research concepts and methods to investigate that subject. As a results we hope to help changing our own behaviour about a topic in selected area. This is Research on Food (industry) month on Researchista, so our little Research is going to be on this subject.

Say hello to Irina B. aka Researchista and Diana Z. aka Social activist, i-care-about-the-environment-lets-do-it-together friend! This is our little Research. What would yours be like? m?

Little Research: “How to Read Food Labels”.

How to know which ingredients are not good for your health? Research is your best friend. Let’s start by making it clear: we love food. So much. You can not imagine.

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Irina B. aka Researchista

At the same time, we wonder what is healthy to eat and what is not? When we go shopping for food, are we actually buying the healthy food? This is our ‘Research question’ (a r.q. is usually stands for the aim/goal/purpose/objective of a scientific study): to what extent the food we buy is healthy? In other words, how to understand what it says on the package of content we buy.

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Diana Z. aka Busy Avocado

And here we start our journey, with the help of food blogger to become and corporate activist in this area, Diana and Irina ‘willing-to-learn how to read the labels’. Let’s figure this out.

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in Park & Shop, Dubai (United Arab Emirates)

First, determine what package of food you consume often and wish to know if it contains any chemicals or unhealthy products.

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in HEMA, Maastricht (Netherlands)

Food labeling is required by law and should be clear, accurate and easy to understand and protect the consumer. It should help the consumers to know what they are buying. It is regulated by different bodies in different countries. Information required to be displayed: ingredients, weight, name of food, storage instructions, use-by-date, clear preparation and cooking instructions, name and address of manufacturer, place of origin, batch number, any genetically modified ingredients, beverages which contain >1.2% alcohol. Nutritional information is only required if there is a nutritional claim made.

dubai

Fats and sugars are contents that need extra research. If most of the fat content comes from healthy unsaturated fat, then it is a green light. If the fat is mainly saturated and/or the product has any trans-fat, it is definitely a no. Also watch out for Vegetable Oil.

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Source: internet

Vegetable oils are manufactured in a factory, usually from genetically modified crops that have been heavily treated with pesticides. Sugar, another “watch out!”,  has many names, 56 to be precise. If we notice these ingredients, besides sugar and if they come as first or second ingredient, better place this product back on the shelf.

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Source: thetruthaboutcancer.com

Once we are clear on the nutrition facts, we can continue with the individual ingredients research. Unfortunately, majority of manufacturers use various sickening ingredients that we cannot even pronounce their names. I have a general rule regarding this, if I cannot read and understand it, I don’t buy it. Watch out for the sickening ingredients: growth hormones, antibiotics, pesticides, artificial sweeteners, BPA, artificial flavors and sweeteners, dyes and conditioners, carrageenan and others.

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Source: simpleobtainablesolutions.com

In conclusion, Researching food products’ labels can be an overwhelming task and maybe sometimes we can end up thinking there is nothing safe left to eat, but eventually the label understanding skills become habits and the process of identifying the good food is becoming as easy as ABC.

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Source: Pinterest, Mariasea

 

Happy Shopping!

Literature review with the courtesy of Busy Avocado and

With love for Research,

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Note from Diana:

“As people are becoming more health conscious, the demands for ethical food is on the rise. By ethical we mean not only sustainable, but also ethically grown, processed, packaged and marketed. Unfortunately, we witness that many large corporations are taking ethics for granted and only care about their profit, thus maximizing production, while neglecting the nutritional value of food. Many products already enter the food chain filled with chemicals and substances that can damage our health. Later on they are processed with additives, dyes, preservatives and thickeners, and eventually packaged in materials that are also hazardous for health. But the worst part is that companies spend thousands to promote these products, create beautiful packages, advertisements and incentives. Moreover, many of them go to the extreme to portray these products as healthy and suitable for children. Stopping these companies from producing and marketing products that contain harmful ingredients is not easy. In many countries corporations have a lot of power in the food industry. But there is another way to combat them. Learn to read and understand labels and avoid products that are clearly damaging your health.

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boring enthusiasm Fashion future health knowledge research

(28) Fashion&Research, part4: your own little Research.

Isn’t it the case that we can all make a change in a our own little ways? Isn’t it the case that we still have the power over our lives and despite many saying “but what can I do” “things work the way they work” or “this is how things work, what do you want?”… “business is business” .. “someone’s got to suffer”, we can in our little own ways make a change, every single day as we rise?

So, fashion, clothes, is a topic that touches us all. Exactly, touching, because if there is nobody to give you a hug, your clothes are there for you every single day. It touches upon most of us, unless you go around naked all the time of course, which is also not an exception, but I guess, clothing and fashion is something that reaches us all to a large extent.

This week, I want to invite you to leave everything we know and learned about how our clothes are made aside (not many wanted to answer to the questions in my poll anyway! :):), so unfortunately, not many things we learned about our each others behaviours) and be a little Researcher for few days! 

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Don’t be afraid, it is not going to bite and most importantly… nobody will know about it!;)

Ok, so what do you need? First, free some space on your hard-drive, ah, just kidding, find some space in your head to think about some things while cleaning your place or walking on the street and think… what is your own clothing-buying clothes-being fashionable behaviour?

Research has many methods, but the first step is to find what is it you need to find out. Is it why you buy too many clothes that you don’t wear? or is it why you do not have style you wish to wear in reality? or is it that you care about the environment and you are not satisfied with how things work in our day in fashion industry?

This is WikiHow, your first-aid tool in how to carry out your little research fashion experiment:

 http://www.wikihow.com/Do-Research

It has pictures of very serious and adult people on it, because Research is a serious business, but maybe my relaxed example below will encourage you to go for it!!

 

*Researchista’s little fashionista research experiment*

The goal of my little Research is to find out: where else can I buy clothes that are eco-friendly, friendly to the environment and respecting fair wages and rights of people? So, now that I know what I need to find out, I started exploring what options I see around me…

Ok, I can also stop buying clothes, but you know how difficult that could be in long-term. Is not that I am growing taller or changing sizes so quickly to need new clothes, but you know how much a colourful new blouse can do to someone in a dark grey day. By no means I want to promote shopping therapy, but sometimes it just really works 🙂 and one more thing. I am sorry, Mark Zuckerberg, I will never survive with similar grey or white t-shirts everyday. I am a woman and I need my colours and diversity in choices.

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The alternatives found from my little Research: 

1) Vintage /or second-hand/

So, here I was, in Bordeaux talking to my friends about Researchista going fashionista. To be clear from the start: we love fashion. We like fancy clothes from the stores, but we also wonder if wearing second-hand clothes or vintage can be a feasible option?

None of us has ever worn anything from a vintage shop, so one time in Maastricht… we got ourselves these unbelievable cheap and nostalgic for 60’s clothes that we proudly wore on the streets of Bordeaux and Arcachon, France. (Ah, I love European Union, with its cheap flights, you can go anywhere you are lucky to go for a very very small price sometimes!)

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We imagined about how women in those times were wearing these clothes, what they were dreaming about and how was it like to live in those times. An (bottom corner, the right lady) was going wild in the shop knowing that her dress is from 1950’s and was having a certain history. AnSo, was loving her synthetic brightly colorful dress (I still think cotton is the way to go), which fits her so well.

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We went on exploring what vintage store Bordeaux has to offer to find to our big surprise, that Bordeaux is a lot about little cute vintage salons. You can see how modern vintage clothes can be and how nicely these can be combined with our every day life!

It proved to be not only a buying clothes alternative, but a great and fun experience with a flavour from various pasts. Thank you, Lionettes!

2) Tailors

But what if I need a working suit or a piece of cloth that I can not find in a vintage store? Or what if I do not like second-hand clothes? Then the tailors is second best solution, according to my Research findings. I could not think about Silvia, who is sewing on this amazing Greek island kids clothes, while having 4 children her own 😀 A lot of inspiration, hey! 🙂

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https://www.facebook.com/Silvia-Kids-Handmade-546287345394729/

Tailors can be found in any city you live and will be there to serve your taste. The only warning that you might consider is that it can take a lot of time.

3) Local brands

The alternative  I came up with is to buy from local producers. These are a sort of tailors, but at a larger scale. Their shops can be extremely cozy and welcoming. You can find there some original pieces of clothes that are produced maybe only 1 time. I love this brand for example, although it is not local to Maastricht where I live, I hope to find its counterpart in NL one day.

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Sweet Paprika 

4) Vegan fashion (coming up)…

 

This was my little Research. What do you need to find out? What did you discover? Let me know below, I am really curious.

Most of all, a little Research can help you find your taste in fashion and your best options

Good luck!

And a little French tune from our trip to Bordeaux here for you

 

With love for Research,

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boring enthusiasm ignorance knowledge Launch Offers passion research Researcher Researchista Special Guest stereotype

(18) Researchista: first 3 months.

Dear Researchista friends,

Our group is increasing and maybe is a good idea to summarise what Researchista is about and what have I been up to since the web-site was launched.

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So, first things first. Researchista is about bringing Research in the mainstream. This is because at the moment, Research is probably not often seen as very hype or trendy, but without it would be no technological, medical or other type of progress. To pay a tribute to that, Research & Researchers on my web-site start with Capital letters 😉

What is Researchista doing? How is it organised?

1. My Facebook page is the dynamic display of Researchista. It’s updated almost everyday of the week and it’s organised in 4 parts:

[BLOG] section is transmitting the same post that is coming out on this web-site every Monday of the week. Also, from time to time, Researchista is inviting and hosting a Special Guest, who knows a lot about a certain topic and can hopefully help in one way or the other. In this sense, I had the privilege to host till now: Dr. Jimmie Leppink on improving writing performance, particularly for PhD students (see: My first paper,  Tips on improving your writing, Writing and Research design, Guest writer preview) and the Health Coach and expert, PhD Danielle Branje on anxiety in professional life (see: “Trust more, stress less“, “Prevention is the key“, “Tips to trick anxiety in your professional life” ).

One day, I hope to introduce you to my PhD supervisor, whose guidance was so valuable and inspiring, and that I hope you will also have the privilege to share some of it as well. But till then: in July, I would like to introduce you to a more laid-back, yet very topical topic, such as: the importance of fashion in our life. Our Special guests, Hasmik Matevosyan , who wrote the book “Paradigm in Fashion”, based on her previous Research, will share her unique model to deal with clothes mass-production and other-related topics. Attention: photos on the streets of beautiful Maastricht are included!

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[PAPER OF THE WEEK] section is coming out every Wednesday (hopefully) and tries to encourage everyone to read academic papers, without fear 🙂

[BOOK OF THE MONTH] is coming out every 1st day of a month and is a recommendation of a book written by Researchers.

[WEEKEND] section is inspired by PhDs life style, who usually work so hard and do not always have a weekend. It tried suggests different ‘feel-good’ ideas, for example:final

2. Www.Researchista.com is a web-site that puts you in closer touch with Researchers’ life. Here, you can find out who can be qualified as a Researchers, how many are we in the world, what types of Researchers exist, these sort of more conceptual questions for you to familiarize better with who we are. On another hand, this blog is addressing various PhD related issues and questions, including: writing performance tips, health, life style, etc. Most importantly, it has the goal to put on the table for discussion.

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3. My Twitter is another useful source that summarises fast and painless what Researchista is up to weekly.

Voila, this is me and all I had to say this time. Enjoy June, they say  – the month of new beginnings! 😉

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With love for Research,

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boring enthusiasm happiness ignorance knowledge research Researcher Researchista

(6) Knowledge is Happiness? II

This is the 2-nd post out of the trilogy on: how knowing more can make us more happy & how to find the right balance (because knowing more can also make us very unhappy)

Is knowledge happiness? Of course it is, Researchers might say. All we do is dealing with knowledge. This is basically our source of happiness, the daily motivator and driver, the joy and glory.  Well, that’s it then, the question is sorted out.

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boring ignorance research Researcher Researchista stereotype Uncategorized

(4) Are Researchers boring?

Considering that the number of Researchers (PhDs included) in Europe and across the world is high and that it is only in recent years  when research has become a ‘paid job’, I find it important to clarify some things: